Counselling


Counselling is a ‘talking therapy’ and allows you to discuss your problems and any difficult feelings you encounter in a safe, confidential environment.

Working in education from more then 37 years, I am not there to tell you what to do. Instead I will encourage you to talk about what’s bothering you in order to uncover any root causes and identify your specific ways of thinking. We will create a plan of action to either help you reconcile your issues or help you to find ways of coping. You can be confident, since I have experience in counselling and the accreditation. I am preparing also to become a psyhologist.

My counselling format includs:

  • Face-to-face – This is when you make an appointment with a counsellor to see them in person, usually at their practice. Face-to-face sessions are one of the more popular therapy formats because they provide an opportunity for you to react to any emotions that arise there and then.
  • Group therapy- If you prefer, you could join a counselling group with people experiencing similar issues. Going to a group counselling session can be helpful if you want to discuss your issues with people who are going through similar problems and you may even gain yourself a support network. Alternatively, you may wish to have an individual therapy, if you prefere  to preserve your privacy and concentrate on your own feelings.

How can I help you, as a Counsellor?

Counselling can be useful for anyone who wants to explore the way they’re thinking or feeling further, as well as anyone experiencing a problem or issue they are keen to resolve. People may choose to speak to a counsellor because they feel they cannot speak to their other half/friends/family about such personal issues, or they may simply wish to speak to a professional with an objective viewpoint.

Common subjects that can be addressed within counselling include the following:

Addictions

Wherever there is a physical addiction to a substance or activity – there is likely to be a psychological addiction too. Counselling aims to relieve the psychological addiction by exploring the root cause while helping to develop new ways of thinking.

Bereavement

Losing a loved one is a difficult event in anyone’s life. The loss can bring up a wide range of emotions including guilt and anger. Some people benefit from speaking openly to a counsellor about their feelings to help ease the process and resolve any remaining issues they may have.

Bullying

Being the victim of any form of abuse, whether it’s verbal or physical can lead to issues that may affect you all of your life. Counselling can offer victims the chance to seek help from authorities (if appropriate) as well as addressing the psychological repercussions in a safe environment.

Illness

Suffering from a long-term illness such as cancer or dementia can turn anyone’s world upside down. Counselling can help sufferers come to terms with their illness while offering emotional support and coping mechanisms.

Mental health issues

Suffering from a mental health issue such as schizophrenia or depression can feel incredibly isolating. Counselling looks to discuss the feelings that arise in conjunction with these kinds of mental health issues as well as overcome any personal challenges or frustrations.

Relationships

Covering all types of relationships, counselling can be used to discuss issues within families, friendships and couples. Problems could involve anything from a poor relationship with a parent through to an abusive relationship.

Trauma

Whether you’ve been involved in an accident or you have been the victim of abuse, the psychological impact of trauma can last years after the event itself. In a counselling session trauma victims are encouraged to explore their feelings regarding the incident and look into how these could be resolved or changed.

Other

Feelings of stress, anxiety and low self-esteem are becoming all too common in today’s society. Counselling can offer practical advice for overcoming these kinds of issues as well as allowing you the space to vent your frustrations and feelings.

How can counselling help?

The way counselling can help will depend on the person receiving the treatment. For many, the fact that counselling offers a safe and confidential environment to speak in is all it takes. In life, what we say to others can sometimes have a knock-on effect, altering relationships and the way people see each other. Counselling eliminates this problem and offers you the space and freedom to explore your own thoughts with an unbiased party.

While counsellors may not give you concrete advice or a checklist of things to do to feel better, what they will do is help you uncover your own insight and understanding of your problems providing you with the tools which will help you to resolve them on your own.

In the majority of cases, a single session will not be enough to help overcome any issues you’re facing. Counselling is a journey, and it takes time and consistency to work effectively. Because of this, many people opt for regular counselling sessions to make the most of the process.

Counselling can help you understand yourself better and the way you think, which will ultimately help you develop a clearer understanding of your problems. The more armed with information you are, the easier it gradually becomes to navigate your way through any difficulties you are facing so that eventually you can come out the other side feeling more positive. Counselling can also help you understand other people’s point of view better, which can shed light onto the way you interpret words or actions.

 What to expect from counselling

If you have decided to try counselling, you might be feeling anxious about your first session. Making the decision to get help and address the issues you are facing is an important first step and should be commended. Knowing what to expect from a counselling session should help you feel more prepared and less nervous about your first appointment.

In your first session I will ask you some questions in order to gain an understanding of what’s worrying you and the way your thought processes work. All of the information obtained here will be used to help you in future sessions.

We will establish a few clear boundaries when you begin your sessions that cover the following:

  • dates and times of the counselling sessions
  • confidentiality agreement
  • clarification of the professional nature of the counsellor/client relationship
  • how and when the counsellor can be contacted outside of sessions.

The counselling process

Counselling often requires you to discuss upsetting emotions and painful memories. Bringing up these thoughts can feel difficult to start with and, initially, you may feel worse. This process is necessary to move forward and in time, you should start to feel better.

To get the most from your counselling sessions you should aim to make them consistent. Some sessions will feel more helpful than others, but it is important to realise that the counselling is designed to help you in the long run, even if it doesn’t feel like it in the beginning.

It is also worth remembering that counselling is not a quick fix and that I will not tell you what to do. The counselling process requires a strong relationship between you and me, as a counsellor and a degree of effort on your part – together these two elements create a successful method to help you resolve your issues.

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